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Large anti-government demonstration in Bangkok on Sunday

Various groups of anti-government protesters, in and on hundreds of cars and motorcycles, gathered at Bangkok’s the Democracy Monument, in the Ratchaprasong commercial district and on Vibhavadi Rangsit highway this morning (Sunday), in a huge demonstration to demand the resignation of Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha.

The so-called “car mob” demonstration saw the gathering together of well-known leaders of anti-government and anti-establishment groups, such as Nattawut Saikua, former secretary-general of the now defunct United Front for Democracy against Dictatorship (UDD) or the Red-Shirt movement, Ratsadon leaders Parit “Penguin” Chiwarak and Anon Nampa, Chatupat Boonpatthararaksa, aka Pai Daodin of the “Thalu Fah” group, Sombat Boon-ngarmanong of Sombat Tour and Piyarat “Toto” Chongthep, leader of the We Volunteer (Wevo) guards.

Nattawut, who was released from prison in December, tweeted today saying that the Red-Shirt movement is back in business and demanding the ouster of the prime minister.

Similar demonstrations are also being held in several other provinces, where there are activists affiliated with the anti-establishment Ratsadon group, such as in the northeastern province of Nakhon Ratchasima.

Protesters from the Ratsadon, United Thammasat and Demonstration and Thalu Fah groups were reported to have arrived at the Democracy Monument in their cars and motorcycles as early as 8am, to wait for their leaders, before their convoy of vehicles moved to join Sombat’s group on Vibhavadi Rangsit highway.

Parit told the media that the convoy would leave the Democracy Monument around noon for a rendezvous with Red-Shirt protesters, led by Nattawut, and Sombat’s protesters, and will then travel around Bangkok and sound their car horns in a gesture of protest against the prime minister, who they blame for his government’s utter failure to contain the spread of COVID-19, leading to more than 4,000 deaths so far.

 

Source: Thai Public Broadcasting Service (Thai PBS)

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